Cactus, it doesn’t taste like chicken

Growing up in the Southwest I ate a lot of Mexican food, especially my mom’s cooking.

She never used nopales to cook, which are prickly pear cactus. I have had it a few times.

On Monday when Curt and I had lunch at a cafe both of our meals came with nopales.

Curt had a Mexican fusion dish with fish, nopales, cheese and salsa verde. I had chicken tacos with chilis and nopales.

So, of course, this prompted me to do some research on the nutritional value of the cactus.

According to Livestrong, a serving is one cup of raw, has 14 calories; 1.1 gram of protein; 0.1 g fat; 2.9 grams of carbohydrates; 1.9 grams of fiber. The cactus also provides vitamins and minerals.

According to Gourmet Sleuth, nopales is a vegetable that can be grilled or boiled. If boiling be careful to not overcook or the cactus can get slimy. (I have definitely eaten it that way and it is kinda gross.)

The Gourmet Sleuth also says, the best preparation we have tried is to prepare the nopal leaves (remove spines) then grill over hot coals till tender and slightly browned. Then slice into nopalitos … Continue reading

Dealing with higher altitude

Who knew I would have things to write about while on vacation?

As soon as we got to Iris and David’s on Sunday night David poured all of us a glass of bottled water. He told us to make sure to have lots of water because of the altitude.

Normally I drink a good amount of water daily. But when I am on vacation or out of my routine I tend to slack on the water intake. So this will be a challenge for me.

David asked me if I could feel the altitude as I walked upstairs to the guest room. I told him no and asked what that would feel like. Apparently heavy breathing and a faster heart beat are some of the symptoms.

The altitude in Mexico City is 7,350 feet. The mile high city, Denver, is 5,280 feet.

According to Wikipedia, Altitude sickness—also known as acute mountain sickness (AMS), altitude illness, hypobaropathy, or soroche—is a pathological effect of high altitude on humans, caused by acute exposure to low partial pressure of oxygen at high altitude. It commonly occurs above 2,400 metres (8,000 feet).[1][2] It presents as a collection of nonspecific symptoms, acquired at high altitude or in low air … Continue reading