Getting my calcium & vitamin D

The other day I had a doctor’s appointment to establish the new doctor/new patient relationship.

As we discussed my health history my doctor (who I think is great) asked me what supplements I take. I told her I take melatonin to help with sleep. I also take Tums for the calcium.

(I started taking calcium recently hoping it will help with my thin, peeling, splitting nails, which I am still trying to resurrect. I wrote about the nail experiment more than a year ago and I am still trying to get these nails healthy.)

I asked my doctor if she recommended a different calcium supplement source. She recommended calcium with vitamin D.

Being a woman I know calcium is important. I eat my cheese and have my Greek yogurt. (I don’t really like milk unless it is in my cereal or I’m having a PB&J.) But I am sure my calcium intake is not what it should be with diet alone.

Calcium is a mineral that is an essential part of bones and teeth. The heart, nerves, and blood-clotting systems also need calcium to work, according to WebMD. … The bones and teeth contain over 99% of the calcium in the … Continue reading

Yoga anatomy

Last night in yoga teacher training class we learned about bones, muscles, joints, connective tissue, etc.

It was fascinating and I learned so much.

It’s A LOT of information. But Baxter broke it down and made it easy to learn (and hopefully remember).

We had Pat, our skeleton, along with two huge diagrams on the muscles and skeleton.

We also had us. Baxter used markers to draw on feet and legs to show us where muscles and bones are placed. We also would feel around our own bones and bodies and feel things move or where something is placed.

I learn best when what I am learning is visual and I can also read about it. The dual learning works best for me. However others learn, all aspects are being used in class and in the readings we are assigned (lots of pictures in our books).

There are so many cool things I learned and I am still struggling with what I am going to share.

Did you know that we have 206 bones in our body? And 52 bones in our feet? The bones in our feet make up almost one-fourth of all the bones in our body.

There … Continue reading

Weight baring yoga poses and osteoporosis

In Baxter’s yoga class the other day we focused on poses that can help the effects of osteoporosis and osteopenia.

I find it fascinating that weight baring exercises, yoga included, can reverse the effects of these conditions.

In a Livestrong article titled, Osteopenia & Yoga, Loren Fishman, physician, author and creator of the website Sciatica.org, has conducted research on the benefits of yoga for osteopenia and osteoporosis. … According to his research, yoga improved both bone mineral density and bone strength, compared to subjects not participating in yoga.

Baxter said research shows that we can stimulate new bone growth along the lines of stress by holding poses (weight baring pose) between 8-72 seconds.

Baxter wrote on his blog Yoga for Healthy Aging, that engaging opposing muscle groups while doing a pose like Downward Facing Dog increases the stimulation of the underlying bone cells that make new bone.

From the Livestrong article, seated postures can benefit the hip; examples include Hero pose, Bound Angle pose and Wide Angle pose. Standing poses put weight on the legs and hips, which help strengthen the bones in these areas; examples include Mountain pose, Triangle pose, Warrior pose and Side Angle pose.

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