Before … after … and now

For about the past year to year and a half I have been the healthiest I have ever been. Not the smallest or thinnest, but the healthiest.

I turn 42 in one month and I feel amazing. And I think I look pretty good, too. I know that’s not what it is all about. It’s about being and feeling healthy. But I’ll be honest, it feels good to look good.

I work hard at being healthy. At times it is easy. And other times it’s so so difficult.

But I haven’t always looked the way I look now.

When I was younger I was considered skinny. (I seriously hate that word and all that it implies.)

I could basically eat and drink anything I wanted and not gain weight.

Then I turned 25. I had a sedentary job. I worked second shift and ate a lot of my meals at my desk, which weren’t actually healthy and usually came in some sort of wrapper (as in fast food).

Over a seven year period I gained 30 pounds.

I hated shopping for clothes. I lacked confidence. It was difficult to go on hikes with friends.

One day a friend and co-worker asked me … Continue reading

My ice breaker

 

I recently wrote about Toastmasters and how I had taken on my first major role in a meeting as the General Evaluator.

Yesterday I took on another major role: The Ice Breaker.

The Ice Breaker is the first prepared talk to “break the ice.” It’s supposed to be the easiest because it is about the person you know the best, yourself.

Funny thing is everything I talked about I am comfortable telling anyone one on one or in a small group. But standing in front of a crowd of people who are all looking at you and listening to you … well, that’s another story.

I hate the anxiety I feel right before and during public speaking. And I want to find ways to be more comfortable in those situations. That’s why I joined Toastmasters.

Public speaking is considered the greatest fear a person can have, even greater than the fear of death.

Challenging myself to get out of my comfort zone takes a lot of convincing. But I know it is important. Toastmasters is a great venue for this. The support is amazing. And I have to say I ended up with an awesome mentor. He … Continue reading

Why is there such a need to define size?

Recently a plus-size model was featured on the front of People magazine with the quote: “I’m proud of my size.”

Robyn Lawley is 6’2″ and is a Size 12.

Wikipedia features Robyn in a photo and mentions her throughout the plus-size model article. Also mentioned is: Synonymous and interchangeable with plus-size model is “full-figured model,” “extended-sizes model,” and “outsize model.”

Where do I begin? First, a woman who is at least 6 feet tall and a Size 12 is considered plus size? Wow! Then I was definitely a fatso years ago before I lost my 30+ pounds at 5’3″.

Second, I find the term plus size offensive. The other terms mentioned above I find even worse than plus size.

Why is there a need to define someone who has excess weight, curves, a big butt, thicker thighs, is tall, isn’t super skinny? We don’t call thin models a super-skinny model. They are just models.

In October of 2006 I was at my highest weight ever. I didn’t feel good about myself. I hated shopping and buying clothes because I had to try them on and nothing ever looked good. I wasn’t obese but could definitely be healthier with … Continue reading