What do toilet seat covers actually do?

In my travels I have noticed that places outside of the US and even some areas of the US don’t have toilet seat covers in public restrooms.

Though I do have to say that many years ago I was at a truck stop in Germany and they had this amazing self-cleaning toilet. It was the cleanest public toilet I have ever used.

I like to use toilet seat covers. But are they really necessary?

From a HuffPost article … Those liners may have more to do with providing comfort and reassurance to the user than actually doing anything to prevent disease, says infectious disease specialist Dr. William Schaffner, M.D., a professor of preventive medicine at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

Someone recently told me if there is no toilet seat cover just hover over the toilet seat.

When you hover your muscles are tense and you can’t completely empty your bladder.

There is actually a WikiHow article teaching you how to urinate. Wow!

But back to the hovering, here’s what WikiHow says: Do not “hover” over the toilet seat since doing so tenses the pelvic muscles. When sitting on the toilet, you should sit completely and keep your … Continue reading

Keep healthy this flu season

I got my flu shot on Friday.

Over the weekend it occurred to me that I should write a post about it. Mostly because there are so many myths about getting the flu shot.

I have gotten the flu shot for at least the past 10 years in a row (and got it while I was a kid and part of the time I was in college) and the shot has NEVER made me sick or get the flu.

I know a lot of people don’t want to get the flu shot for a variety of reasons. And that’s your right.

But if you aren’t going to get the vaccine there are other things you can do to prevent the spread of the flu (and other illnesses).

You should also do these things if you get the flu vaccine.

Regularly wash your hands. If you can’t wash your hands, use hand sanitizer (I keep some in my purse and I used to keep it on my desk at work).

Clean your work/home desk, cell phone, keys, door knobs, light switches, anything you touch and are in contact with regularly with Clorox or Lysol wipes.

If you are sick, stay home. … Continue reading

The contagious cold

I have a cold.

And man, it sure makes me tired.

I have skipped the gym since Thursday evening, when I thought I might be getting sick. I don’t exercise when I am sick as I personally believe my energy should be reserved for getting back to healthy. But that’s not what this post is about. (I wrote about that before if you are interested, go here.)

I had heard that a cold is contagious before symptoms even appear.

According to MedTV, the period when you’re most contagious is when your symptoms are at their worst — Day 2 to Day 4 of the cold. You’ll become less contagious as the cold symptoms improve.

Go Ask Alice says, studies show that, if you contract a cold, you can transmit it to others one or two days before your symptoms appear, and up to four or five days after first being exposed to the virus.

According to Discovery Health, if you think about how a virus works, it makes sense that we’re most contagious when our symptoms are at their worst. … So, when are you most contagious? Most experts agree that adults with a cold or the flu start being contagious about … Continue reading

Time for the flu shot

Today my company hosted a flu shot clinic.

For all eight years it has been offered to me I have taken advantage of the convenience and the free shot. I absolutely hate shots and needles.

But I like my health more than I hate needles. So my wienie self sucks it up.

Other jobs have offered the free flu vaccine as well and I have always taken advantage of it.

There are some people who don’t want to get the shot or won’t. I respect that.

But what I ask my friends and loved ones and even those I don’t know or have never even met who refuse the shot, when you are sick, please stay home and don’t bring your germs to work (or anywhere else where you can avoid spreading your cooties).

I realize the flu shot doesn’t cover all strains.

And it doesn’t help prevent the common cold, which for some reason many people I have encountered believe this misconception.

The Mayo Clinic posts some facts I want to share with you:

Should you exercise when sick?

For me, the simple answer is no. When I don’t feel well I don’t work out. I feel that my immune system needs rest and it needs to work on getting healthy and nothing else.

I have a slight cold and I haven’t worked out since Sunday.

I did a little research to see what experts thought. Some agreed with me and others felt that the common cold was OK to take to the gym.

According to this site, you can exercise if you have a cold, but no fever. Though Dr. Edward T. Laskowski says you should listen to your body.

Dr. Rick Kellerman says, “Even though it may be tempting to not break an exercise routine, working out may actually prolong the illness.”

And Shazia Khan says pretty much the same thing as Dr. Laskowski about how you can exercise if you have no fever and you cold is above the neck.

Liz Applegate says, forget about what you might have heard about trying to perspire your way back to better health.

And WebMD says you can exercise when you have the common cold, but stay home when you have a fever or … Continue reading