The risks of ultraviolet exposure

Since moving to Portland I have noticed a lot of dentists, Goodwill stores and pet hospitals.

There are also a lot of tanning salons.

According to Sperling’s Best Places, on average Portland has 144 days of sun a year. (The U.S. in general has 205 average sunny days.) Current Results estimates Portland to have 142 days of sun a year. (Current Results says Tucson [my hometown] has 284 days of sun a year.)

Some sun exposure is good for our health. From my post on calcium and vitamin D last week I mentioned that according to Medical News Today, it is estimated that sensible sun exposure on bare skin for 5-10 minutes two to three times per week allows the body the ability to produce sufficient vitamin D.

Living in the Northwest can sometimes make it difficult to get exposure to the sun.

As I mentioned earlier and in posts previously I was born, bred and educated in Tucson, Ariz. As a young teenager my goal during the summer break was to get the best tan possible. I really didn’t wear sunscreen and hardly ever burned. I also used to slather my body in baby oil to toast … Continue reading

Getting my calcium & vitamin D

The other day I had a doctor’s appointment to establish the new doctor/new patient relationship.

As we discussed my health history my doctor (who I think is great) asked me what supplements I take. I told her I take melatonin to help with sleep. I also take Tums for the calcium.

(I started taking calcium recently hoping it will help with my thin, peeling, splitting nails, which I am still trying to resurrect. I wrote about the nail experiment more than a year ago and I am still trying to get these nails healthy.)

I asked my doctor if she recommended a different calcium supplement source. She recommended calcium with vitamin D.

Being a woman I know calcium is important. I eat my cheese and have my Greek yogurt. (I don’t really like milk unless it is in my cereal or I’m having a PB&J.) But I am sure my calcium intake is not what it should be with diet alone.

Calcium is a mineral that is an essential part of bones and teeth. The heart, nerves, and blood-clotting systems also need calcium to work, according to WebMD. … The bones and teeth contain over 99% of the calcium in the … Continue reading

Can the breath cure hiccups?

breathing1I recently got the hiccups. I decided to do some research on why we get them. They are such a nuisance, aren’t they?

Curt recommended me doing research on a yoga pose that helps stop hiccups. Why didn’t I think of that?

First, what is  a hiccup?

According to Medical News Today, a hiccup occurs when the diaphragm suddenly contracts involuntarily, while at the same time the larynx (voice box) contracts too and the glottis closes, effective blocking the flow of air.

Why do we get hiccups?

The Science Museum says that there doesn’t seem to be any known function of hiccups in the body. … Hiccups once served a purpose in the animals we evolved from. … One idea is that the hiccup evolved to help our four-legged ancestors to swallow food that got stuck in their throats. Where we have the luxury of gravity helping food down, quadrupeds (animals that walk on all fours) have to shift their food horizontally to get it from their mouths to their stomachs. This means it’s easier for lumps of … Continue reading

My fragrance sensitivity

As I am getting ready to travel my fear of being stuck next to someone on the plane who is wearing perfume, smelly lotion or hair products or cologne or aftershave I start to worry.

According to this Livestrong article, fragrance sensitivity, also called multiple chemical sensitivity or environmental illness, is not technically an allergic histamine reaction, but it can cause uncomfortable, painful or even debilitating symptoms. Common symptoms include headache, nausea and tightening of the throat.

When I encounter someone wearing perfume, smelly lotion or hair products or even fragrant laundry detergent or air freshener for an extended period of time I get a raging headache and feel nauseated.

When we moved into a new building at work the new carpet smell gave me a raging headache and nausea. Even after I left work the symptoms lasted for hours.

I have had to ask people at work who I have closely worked with to stop wearing a perfume or smelly lotion. One time someone said, but it is expensive perfume. Yea, that has nothing to do with it.

An article in Medical News Today says, until the 20th century, perfumes were made from natural ingredients derived directly from plants … Continue reading